Thursday, December 16, 2004

How Was It For You?

Maybe I should put up a Christmas poem. I’ll do that next. Hey ho... ho ho. Well, the house is all bright and sparkly. I’ve nearly finished the children’s story. It’s going well now that I’ve got a bit more time. The Molecules recording’s going well too. My mother’s gone home. Jill’s been in Nottingham this week but has returned – hooray! She's at home for the next few weeks now. Tomorrow - a friend’s birthday – we’re having a take away. Probably Indian. Talking of which - Jill has to visit the nurse tomorrow for her jabs in preparation for her Indian visit next year. I’m planning to finish the story by Friday. Then get the outline for the graphic novel finished next week. If I can do that and get the albums made by Christmas I’ll be well pleased. Meanwhile - Joe’s girlfriend’s family is coming on Sunday for a pre-Christmas dinner. Watch this space.

I was wondering. Do we, as adults, ever have a Christmas as good as the ones we had as children. Assuming we had a Christmas. Faith and privilege notwithstanding. Or do we just remember it being special? Was it rubbish really?

11 comments:

Jonathan said...

Where and why is Jilly going to in India.
Wonderful place... I lived there for a year...
84-85... was one of the best times of my life.
Lot's of blogging material, there...

WeirdLoverWilde said...

There are a few things that make Christmas different for a child than an adult:

I think we tend to lose our sense of 'awe' as we get older.

Everything goes so goddamn slow when you're a kid, waiting for Christmas... then you grow older and you want everything to slow the fuck down, because it's going so goddamn fast.

And of course: no stress - when you're a kid, you're not shopping, cooking, working, etc. You just go with the flow.

Oh: maybe one more thing - As you get older, I think Christmas becomes less 'me-centered' and more about making other people happy.

Sunshine Coyote said...

Very true. My favorite part of Christmas was baking cookies the night before and just generally not being able to sleep. The lights everywhere, the coolness in the air, the cinnamon spice and all that is nice about Winter and darkness and nights by the fire.

Christmas does change as we get older, but I like how every year I see a different form of what it means in this world to me. I don't have a family, but I imagine that the stress and excitement of preparing a magical Christmas (even if you don't have much) is just divine. That's it in some way, there is a magic we generate at this time of year that pulses from one person to the next like a pinball.

On the other hand, too much of a good thing can create quite the opposite if not careful. So, anyway...Christmas poem = magic for all of us who love your writing.

Bring it on, dear! To Mary on this Merry occassion, pass the nog and candied yams...

michael said...

My comments keep vanishing into oblivion? Does anyone else have that trouble? I've changed browsers to safari as the folks at Flickr said they preferred it.
As for crimble as i like to call it. Its not very magical for me but hopefully still a fun time for Archie who is still young enough to enjoy some aspects of it although he knows santa is just somebody Coca-Cola dreamed up to sell more fizzy tooth rot!

Jonathan said...

I remember drawing my Christmas list to Santa... using the Sears catalogue as my guide.
I think that I believed in Santa until I was 30 or so...
there's no way that Mum and Dad could have afforded all the loot that was under the tree.

Stan said...

The only way I know to have a Christmas as good as when you were a child is to do it with someone you're totally in love with. I don't mean with someone you love, but with someone you're head-over-heels in love with.

Amie said...

Christmas being special is all really dependent on ones outlook of it. Will it only make it special because of the new things? Good stuff? Anyway what is Christmas to a person? As I’m a catholic Christmas is special because it's Jesus b-day, and what makes it even more special is because all my love ones gather at the times like this.... family and friends -we celebrate it together...like a reunion we’re all present to celebrate the day. It has been like that when I was still a child, and still is now that I’m grown up, and probably the same when I have a family of my own.

Syl said...

My Dad, who died some years ago,
was like a little boy in some ways...
he never lost his sense of excitement.
Come Christmas holidays, he transformed
our house into a winter wonderland...
greenery everywhere, glowing lights,
crackling fire, Friends and neighbors
were invited over to share a wonderful
buffet and eggnog I'm sure was well
spiked! And Mum always prepared a
second meal, same as ours, which we
took to a needy family. I really miss
those times and suppose that's why I love
to see Christmas lights everywhere. Even
today it's magical.

bill said...

I don't think it was ruhbish. Maybe not as magical as we thought, because as kids we couldn't see the man behind the curtain, and now we *are* the man behind the curtain, but not rubbish. Anything that continues and encourages the spirit of Christmas -- the idea that caring matters, that sharing is good, and that people are worthwhile -- can't be rubbish.

Now, recyclable, that's a different story.

Roger Stevens said...

So that's a general yes, then, for Crimble. I still enjoy it. I still think it has a certain magic. I did disbelieve in Santa for a few years in my late teens, but it's okay - because I believe again now.

Roger Stevens said...

Oh yeah, and forgot so say (in case you were wrorrying about it) - the first draft of the children's story's all done. Hurrah!!!!